The Chambers Bros at the Matrix, Victor Moscoso

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Artist   Victor Moscoso - View Bio
Title   The Chambers Bros at the Matrix
Date Of Work   1967
Dimensions   14" x 20"
Notes   Original: The Chambers Brothers is a soul-music group, best known for its 1968 hit record, the 11-minute long song "Time Has Come Today". The group was part of the wave of new music that integrated American blues and gospel traditions with modern psychedelic and rock elements, spawning a heady mix integrating all these factors. Based on their Southern roots, the brothers brought a raw authenticity to their recordings and live performances that was missing from many other acts of that era. Their music has been kept alive through heavy use in film soundtracks.

The Chambers Brothers first honed their skills as members of the choir in their Baptist church. This set up ended in 1952 when older brother George was drafted into the army. After his discharge George moved to Los Angeles. The other Chambers brothers soon settled there as well. As a foursome, they began performing gospel and folk throughout the Southern California region in 1954, but they more or less remained unknown until appearing in New York City in 1965.

Later on when the group had a regional hit with the song "All Strung Out Over You", Columbia allowed Rubinson and the Chambers Brothers to re-record "Time" in 1967. By this time they had expanded "Time" to be the showpiece of their live show. They recorded the new version in one take with all of the effects live in the studio. Rubinson had set up the reverb and reinsertion things with Fred Catero, the studio engineer. Rubinson recalled that it was just one of those incredible magic sessions with all of them reacting to each other and even the trippy time tunnel section in the center of the song was a spontaneous creation.

The band scored its first major hit in 1968 with "Time Has Come Today" (written by Joe & Willie Chambers), from the group's similarly named third album, "The Time Has Come". The song spent five consecutive weeks at #11 on the Billboard Hot 100, just missing the Top Ten.

This vintage poster was printed in 1967
Price Category   Category B  View Price Categories
Inventory Number   12729